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Jam thumbprint cookies

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Somebody pinch me because I must be dreaming: there’s a dog on my bed. It’s pretty surreal right now, and I’m kind of feeling a little stunned. Jynx is sleeping towards the top of the bed, with her head on the pillow, while I sit at the dinning room table, trying to work, mostly in shock. I’m spending much of my time glancing over to check on her, but also to confirm that she’s actually here. There’s a dog on my bed!

 

Jynx on the bed

By Wednesday of last week, I knew Jynx was going to come for her doggy sleepover on Sunday, and I immediately went into action with two goals. First goal: get all blog post recipes developed, baked, and photographed before she got here. I figured it was best to get a few completed for the simple reason that Jynx is a rescued dog, so she’s very shy and easily freightened. The last thing she needs is to come here and have to face me, banging on the pots and pans, running the mixer, and generally making all kinds of noise and chaos. Of course, eventually, she will have to be initiated to the tornado that is me in the kitchen, working on a blog post recipe, but perhaps not on her first visit.

Making jam thumbprint cookies | Janice Lawandi @ kitchen heals soul

Second goal: “prepare” the apartment for Jynx’s arrival. This may seem a little ridiculous because dogs shed and drool all over the place, but I felt like I had to scrub the place clean while, of course, doggy-proofing the apartment. Zen was never interested in any of my baking, the bags of ingredients, or the general untidiness. She was so amazing for that, along with a million other reasons. But a dog could potentially eat a bag of flour, or worse, if left to her own devices. I tidied and cleaned to the point where I even took down the curtains and washed them. I washed the windows, and I vacuumed about three times (okay, maybe four). I mopped the floor. I even gave the fridge a once over. As I cleaned the filters from the hood above my stove, I realized that I must be in the “nesting phase,” like when one prepares for the arrival of a baby, or in my case, the three year old puppy named Jynx.

Filling jam thumbprint cookies | Janice Lawandi @ kitchen heals soul

My apartment is as close to spotless as it has ever been, I have recipes developed and photographed for the next 3 weeks, and there’s a dog sound asleep on my bed. Somebody pinch me because I must be dreaming.

 

Jam thumbprint cookies and tea | Janice Lawandi @ kitchen heals soul

These cookies are simple to make and a great way to feature a little of your summer’s homemade jam. For these cookies, I used the rhubarb juniper berry jam I made in June, and the plum cinnamon jam I made in July. These would even work with marmalade too, as long as it’s thin cut and not too runny.

Jam thumbprint cookies recipe

 

Jam Thumbprint cookies
5 from 1 vote
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Jam thumbprint cookies

These cookies are simple to make and a great way to feature a little of your summer’s homemade jam. The cookie dough makes a buttery vanilla sugar cookie, the perfect complement to your favourite jam.

Course Dessert
Cuisine American, British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 25 cookies
Calories 92 kcal
Author Janice

Ingredients

  • 115 g unsalted butter 1/2 cup, room temperature
  • 100 g granulated sugar 1/2 cup
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 156 g all-purpose flour 1 1/4 cups
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 125 mL thick jam

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line a couple baking sheets with parchment.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter with the sugar for a couple minutes until it is lightened in color and well mixed.
  3. Add the egg yolk, then the vanilla, beating with each addition and scraping the sides of the bowl as needed.
  4. Add the flour and salt and stir on low to combine, then increase the speed to medium until a dough forms and the bowl is clean.
  5. Divide the dough into 25 balls, rolling each into a smooth ball.
  6. Place the cookie dough balls on the parchment-lined sheets and press the center with your thumb or the rounded back end of a wooden spoon.
  7. {baking method #1}: Fill the thumbprints before baking with 1/4 tsp jam each, then bake for about 10 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool. This method yields "stackable"/"storable" cookies with a little of jam that's just a little tacky but very set.
    {baking method #2}: Bake the thumbprints unfilled (8–10 min), then press the centres back down when they are still warm, fill with 1/2 tsp jam in each and bake again for several minutes to set the jam (about 4 min). Transfer to a rack to cool. This method yields "stackable"/"storable" cookies with lots of jam that's just a little tacky but quite set.
    {baking method #3}: Bake them unfilled (8–10 min), press the centres back down before they've cooled, then fill once they are cooled. Transfer to a rack to cool. This method yields cookies that are filled with fresh, sweet jam but that can't be stored easily

Recipe Notes

For this recipe, I used Stirling Creamery Churn 84 unsalted butter

 

 

I do my best to bake with the finest ingredients. Stirling Creamery, a Canadian company, has provided the butter for this post.

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2 Responses to Jam thumbprint cookies

  1. Aimee @ Simple Bites August 5, 2014 at 9:58 am #

    Cannot wait to try these!! You know I have lots of jam around here. 😉

  2. Teresa December 3, 2014 at 9:37 pm #

    Congratulations on the new addition to your family! We got our dog when she was sixteen weeks old, because the daughter in the family she was originally living with turned out to be allergic to her. So, she’s a rescue of a sort, too. She’s seven now and we love her to pieces. Here’s to many happy years with Jynx!

    And those thumbprint cookies look irresistible.

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