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Chocolate pavlovas

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chocolate pavlova with whipped cream and pomegranate seeds | kitchen heals soul

We need to talk about pomegranates. I love them, and while I realize that getting all the tiny seeds out of a pomegranate can be scary and daunting, that doesn’t mean you have to beat the crap out of the fruit to extract them. Seriously. Why would you even think it’s okay to beat a fruit? Oh, right, there was a youtube video. That still doesn’t make sense. I’d really like to meet the person that started this madness so we could have a serious word.

cutting into a pomegranate | kitchen heals soul

Here’s how I get the seeds out of a pomegranate. I cut the fruit in half, and using my hands, I break the halves into quarters. Then working over a large, deep bowl (or tupperware), I just work out all the seeds with my fingertips, breaking the pomegranate wedges into sections as I go. It’s not hard. It doesn’t take very long. The seeds are clearly clustered as you can see when you open one up. It’s just a matter of revealing each pocket of seeds and emptying it out.

There’s no need to get violent, people.
When you are done, fill the bowl containing the pomegranate seeds with water, and the little leftover bits of the peel/pith will float up to the surface so you can easily scoop them out. Drain, et voilà!

how to remove the seeds from a pomegranate | kitchen heals soul

My blog has been all brown and winter lately, with citrusy three fruit marmalade and steamed marmalade pudding cakes, but I needed something a little more bright and vibrant, like pomegranates. I think we could all use a little pomegranate these days, but promise me you won’t beat it with a wooden spoon. That’s just unnecessary violence.

chocolate pavlovas ready for the oven | kitchen heals soul

Pomegranates are beautiful, and just like I think you should take the time to make brown butter, I think you should take the time to open up a pomegranate to carefully pull out all of its seeds. And, when the work is done, you have a big bowl of pomegranate seeds ready for anything and everything, like these pavlovas.

chocolate pavlova with whipped cream and pomegranate seeds | kitchen heals soul

Pavlovas are like meringues, but different. There’s a chew to them that typical meringues don’t usually have. Pavlovas are crispy and kind of hollow. I love the way they break apart in large flakes when you cut into them. Don’t let their pale exterior fool you: the combination of cocoa powder and dark chocolate in these pavlovas makes for a real hit of chocolate.

chocolate pavlova with whipped cream and pomegranate seeds | kitchen heals soul
 
 
Top them with anything you like. I definitely recommend lots of whipped cream, and pomegranate seeds (or fresh berries, if it’s the season). Pavlovas are the perfect remedy for the winter blues.Eating pavlovas like these is messy. You can try a fork and knife if you are feeling dainty, but honestly, I’d recommend some hand-held eating, like pizza.
 
chocolate pavlova with whipped cream and pomegranate seeds | kitchen heals soul
 
 Original recipe: Nigella Lawson.

Chocolate pavlovas recipe

 

Chocolate pavlovas

Pavlovas are like meringues, but different. There’s a chew to them that typical meringues don’t usually have. Pavlovas are crispy and kind of hollow. I love the way they break apart in large flakes when you cut into them. Don’t let their pale exterior fool you: the combination of cocoa powder and dark chocolate in these pavlovas makes for a real hit of chocolate.
Course Dessert
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 131kcal
Author Janice

Ingredients

  • 3 egg whites 90 grams
  • 150 grams granulated sugar
  • 1.5 tbsp Cacao Barry extra brute cocoa powder
  • 1/2 tsp cider vinegar
  • 25 grams dark chocolate chopped
  • Lots of whipped cream
  • Seeds of 1 pomegranate

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line a couple baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form.
  • With the mixer running, gradually add the granulated sugar and continue beating until the meringue is firm.
  • Sift the cocoa powder over top, then sprinkle in the vinegar, and the chopped chocolate, and gently but quickly fold until everything is incorporated.
  • Dollop the chocolate pavlova mixture onto the baking sheets, placing about 3 or 4 on each sheet, leaving room for them to expand in the oven. Swirl and smooth the dollops with an offset spatula.
  • Place the baking sheets in the oven, and then lower the oven temperature to 300ºF. Bake the pavlovas for about 30 minutes, then turn off the oven, prop open the door, and let them cool completely (I left them overnight because it’s winter and there was no worry of humidity in the house).
  • Serve the pavlovas with generous amounts of whipped cream and pomegranate seeds

Notes

For this recipe, I used Cacao Barry ocoa chocolate available at IGA grocery stores in Quebec and online at Vanilla Food Company
Tried this recipe?Mention @kitchenhealssoul or tag #kitchenhealssoul!

Nutrition

Calories: 131kcal

berries, chocolate, meringue

7 Responses to Chocolate pavlovas

  1. Liz February 17, 2014 at 3:16 PM #

    These look really awesome! The only pavlova I have ever had was a full, pie-sized one made by an Australian woman and filled with fresh fruit. We cut it and ate it like a pie. No chocolate though 🙁

  2. Elise March 8, 2014 at 8:38 PM #

    When poms came in season this year, beating them exploded on the Internet. A friend actually took one of my home grown, perfectly ripe pomegranates and beat the heck out of it in front of me to get the seeds out of it. I almost cried. At least a quarter of those seeds were bruised or broken by the time he was done with it.

    • Janice Lawandi March 8, 2014 at 10:02 PM #

      Exactly! It just bruises it more than anything else, and when I tried, I found it much harder actually than taking the time to get the seeds out by hand.
      I can imagine how tragic it would be to watch somebody to do that to one I grew myself! Yikes!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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  3. What is baking powder? | Kitchen Heals Soul - January 27, 2020

    […] making meringues for an italian meringue buttercream, or in egg-white based desserts like these chocolate pavlovas. And combined with baking soda and a little cornstarch, you have yourself some homemade baking […]

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